Scientists warn that antibiotic-resistant gonorrhoea is on the rise

WHO, 07 July 2017

Every day, more than 1 million sexually transmitted infections are acquired worldwide, and each year an estimated 78 million people are infected with gonorrhoea. New data from 77 countries show that antibiotic resistance is making gonorrhoea much harder – and sometimes impossible – to treat.

The data has been published in PLOS, in two new scientific articles.

AMA throws its weight behind same-sex marriage, declares it a health issue

The Age

The nation’s most powerful doctors’ group has thrown its weight behind same-sex marriage for the first time, declaring it a public health issue and calling on politicians to end the divisive debate.

In an unprecedented move, the president of the typically conservative group, Dr Michael Gannon, has written to Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and Opposition Leader Bill Shorten urging bipartisanship.

  • Read more of article here
  • Read AMA press release here
  • Download position paper here 

 

 

Pregnancy problems are leading global killer of ​​females aged 15 to 19

The Guardian, Tuesday 16 May 2017

Pregnancy complications are the leading cause of death globally among females aged 15-19, with self-harm in second place, a global study has found.

More than 1.2 million female and male adolescents die annually, the World Health roaOrganization (WHO) report said – the majority from preventable causes including mental health issues, poor nutrition, reproductive health problems and violence.

 

Increased screening for syphilis boosts detection of early latent infections among Australian gay men

nam/aidsmap,  Published: 03 May 2017

Increased syphilis testing among gay men increased detection of early latent infections and was accompanied by a fall in the proportion of cases involving secondary syphilis, investigators report in the online edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

  • Read more here 
  • Access article abstract here (for full text, see your librarian)

 

 

Female genital mutilation is hurting Australian girls and we must work together to stamp it out

The Conversation, February 9th, 2017

Female genital mutilation or cutting is largely hidden in Australia and other high-income countries. Most people don’t consider it a major issue. But our research shows it should be.

Our research found girls are presenting to paediatricians in Australia with female genital mutilation, but misconceptions about the practice are common and doctors want more information on how to manage this illegal practice.

  • Read more of article here 
  • Read Female genital mutilation and cutting: a systematic literature review of health professionals’ knowledge, attitudes and clinical practice (open access) here
  • Read Female genital mutilation in children presenting to Australian paediatricians (open access) here

 

Female genital mutilation in children presenting to Australian paediatricians

Arch Dis Child doi:10.1136/archdischild-2016-311540

Abstract

Objective The WHO reports that female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) is an ancient cultural practice prevalent in many countries. FGM/C has been reported among women resident in Australia. Our paper provides the first description of FGM/C in Australian children.

Design Cross-sectional survey conducted in April–June 2014.

Setting Paediatricians and other child health specialists recruited through the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit were asked to report children aged <18 years with FGM/C seen in the last 5 years, and to provide data for demographics, FGM/C type, complications and referral for each case.

Participants Of 1311 eligible paediatricians/child health specialists, 1003 (76.5%) responded.

Results Twenty-three (2.3%) respondents had seen 59 children with FGM/C and provided detailed data for 31. Most (89.7%) were identified during refugee screening and were born in Africa. Three (10.3%) were born in Australia: two had FGM/C in Australia and one in Indonesia. All parents were born overseas, mainly Africa (98.1%). Ten children had WHO FGM/C type I, five type II, five type III and six type IV. Complications in eight children included recurrent genitourinary infections, menstrual, sexual, fertility and psychological problems. Nineteen children (82.6%) were referred to obstetrics/gynaecology: 16 (69.9%) to social work and 13 (56.5%) to child protection.

Conclusions This study confirms that FGM/C is seen in paediatric clinical practice within Australia. Paediatricians need cultural awareness, education and resources to help them identify children with FGM/C and/or at risk of FGM/C, to enable appropriate referral and counselling of children, families and communities to assist in the prevention of this practice.

Access full text (open access) here