16 days of activism events: Charles Sturt is Saying No to Domestic and Family Violence

City of Charles Sturt, November 2018

Charles Sturt is partnering with local community groups, sports clubs, schools, businesses and key stakeholders to raise awareness and implement violence prevention activities. Several activities are planned for the 16 days of activism from the 25 November (International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women) to 10 December (Human Rights Day).  The 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence Campaign is a time to stimulate action to end violence around the world.

Act of love

Twelve artists have been paired up with members in our community affected by domestic and family violence to paint their portrait. The portraits are a thoughtful portrayal of a larger story capturing exhibition. The Act of Love is the interchange between the artist and the sitter, with the finished portrait being gifted to the sitter at the end of the exhibition.

Clothesline Project

Community members are encouraged to share their unique and empowering responses to Domestic and family violence and decorate a t-shirt. All the t-shirts will be strung up on clotheslines and displayed at various locations across the city to raise awareness. Various locations will be available to paint the t-shirts.

Message to my Love campaign

During the sixteen days of activism at the Civic Library, the Digital Story Box will become a personal story capturing device. Our community will be invited to pick up the phone, listen to a story and then record a personal message of love and respect for a loved one in their life. This could be a daughter, son, partner, parent, best friend or anyone that you love. Leaders in our community will initially be interviewed  and these stories will then be able to be viewed and heard as part of the campaign.

Associated events and exhibitions will also be scheduled during this time as a way to share messages and stories which aim to raise confidence and awareness in our community.

As part of the Message to my Love project, we will be sending post cards with rates notices for community to write their messages. There will be a survey monkey link on the post card for people to fill in online or their will be selected locations to drop in the postcard where they will be displayed as part of the #messagetomylove campaign.

We will be out and about filming community messages at different public spaces. Keep an eye out on our website, social media for further information.

This is an exciting time for our council.  We are committed to creating safe families and communities for everyone and we welcome your involvement in these activities. If you would like more information about these activities and programs please contact Khadija at: kgbla@charlesturt.sa.gov.au

If you or someone you know is experiencing domestic violence or feel unsafe in an intimate or family relationship, 24 hour assistance is available on 1800 RESPECT (1800 737 732), which is the National Sexual Assault Domestic & Family Violence Counselling Service. Or you can go to www.1800respect.org.au

 

Summary of results: Trans Pathways: the mental health experiences and care pathways of trans young people

Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, September 1, 2017

Trans Pathways is the largest study ever conducted of the mental health and care pathways of trans and gender diverse young people in Australia (859 participants). It is also the first Australian study to incorporate the views of parents and guardians of trans young people (194 participants).

What did Trans Pathways tell us?

  • Trans young people are at very high risk for poor mental health, self-harming and suicide attempts
  • Trans young people found it difficult to access health services
  • Many trans young people have experienced negative situations that affect their mental health such as peer rejection, bullying, issues with school, university or TAFE, and a lack of family support
  • Participants told us they used music and art, peers and friends, activism, social media and pets to make themselves feel better and take care of their mental wellbeing

The authors have provided a list of recommendations for governments and health providers, as well as guidance for schools, parents, peers and young trans people.

Download report:

If you or anyone you know needs help:

The laws that sex workers really want (video)

(Via SIN, April 2017)

Laws can be complicated, but the sex worker community agrees on decriminalisation. Watch sex worker and activist Juno Mac unpack the different legal frameworks that affect sex workers, and then explain that decriminalisation is the only way forward.

“If you care about gender equality or poverty or migration or public health, then sex worker rights matter to you,” she says. “Make space for us in your movements.”

  • Watch the TED talk here

 

Sex worker and activist Laura Lee: ‘It’s now far more difficult to stay safe’

The Guardian, Saturday 6 February 2016

There aren’t many sex workers in Britain happy to talk openly about their work, so Laura Lee is used to being interviewed. She is managing to be remarkably upbeat, on just four hours’ sleep. Lee will need all her reserves of cheerful energy during the next fortnight, as she prepares a legal challenge against the government of Northern Ireland, which last June introduced radical new legislation making it illegal to pay for sex.

Although, in the abstract, the change in the law appears positive, shifting the burden of criminality from women firmly on to their clients, most sex workers believe the new law makes their work much more unsafe.

Read more here

My Body, My Rights – Female Genital Mutilation

Sarian Karim Kamara at Fuuse Forum, Published on 24 Jan 2016

For many years, the problem of FGM has been treated as almost too delicate to address: while laws may be changed, prosecutions rarely follow. More importantly, the necessary safeguarding and prevention measures in schools and in systems of healthcare are underdeveloped. This complacency has been partly justified by a wish to avoid upsetting the sensitivities of minority communities. However, a new generation of activists are leading the battle from inside their own communities, bringing a new urgency and passion to combatting this form of violence against women.

The activists taking part in this Fuuse Forum represent this courageous new wave of anti-FGM activism, developed by women within the affected communities, standing up for their rights over their own bodies against the weight of tradition and identity.

Sarian Karim Kamara is a Community Development worker, Community facilitator, an activist and anti FGM campaigner. She is also a survivor of FGM.

Here she speaks about her FGM story, at the FUUSE forum on “My Body, My Rights – Female Genital Mutilation”.

(Watch embedded video below in this post)

HIV’s shot of adrenalin comes in the form of Rapture

Star Observer, January 8, 2016

A new HIV initiative which has been described as “a shot of adrenaline to the heart of the HIV response” has just been launched in Melbourne.

Rapture, which stands for Rapid Agile PrEP Team for a Unified Responsive End, was founded by PrEP advocate Rodney Ellis and HIV activist Daniel Brace who are aiming to roll out PrEP awareness and education to HIV negative people across Australia.

Read more here