Pride in Prevention: A guide to primary prevention of family violence experienced by LGBTIQ communities.

Pride in Prevention Evidence Guide

Produced by Rainbow Health Victoria for the LGBTIQ Family Violence Prevention Project 2019–202, launched 30 Jun 2020

Authors: Marina Carman, Jackson Fairchild, Matthew Parsons, Claire Farrugia, Jennifer Power and Adam Bourne.

The Pride in Prevention Evidence Guide  is now available to download.

This project forges new ground in the primary prevention of family violence experienced by LGBTIQ communities, seeking to address critical evidence gaps, strengthen understanding of the drivers of violence, and build expertise for both LGBTIQ organisations and family violence primary prevention organisations to effectively deliver evidence-based programs.

New Resource for young LGBTIQA+ people

Victim Support Service, May 2020

The Rainbow Safety Guide is an informational wallet card that links LGBTIQ+ youth experiencing violence and abuse to online and phone resources. The Guide was made by and for LGBTIQ+ youth.


meet the artist/DESIGNER: India Potter (she/they is an Adelaide based young queer artist who does both digital and watercolour designs. Her art often portrays the queer community and aspects of LGBTIQ+ life. Both an artist and graphic designer, India created the art and designed the wallet card, taking special care to create art that was representative, colourful, but discreet enough that without the first page the Rainbow Safety Guide is less obviously a LGBTIQ+ resource.


This wallet sized Guide can be easily carried around by its user. It provides links to support services & information that may help them by:
• phone numbers
• online links
• QR codes

Due to the card’s small size it can be shared discreetly so as to not unintentionally “out” the recipient. If you are not in a position to physically give the card to someone, you can share this online link or our other LGBTIQ+ pages. The quick exit feature allows the reader to hide the page quickly if needed.

This wallet card will be valuable to services who work with youth, as well as individuals who know a young LGBTIQ+ person who they know or suspect is experiencing violence or abuse.

  • Read more at the VSS website here
  • To view or download the Rainbow Safety Guide card (PDF), click here
  • To request a physical copy email the VSS helpdesk at helpdesk@victimsa.org

 

Developing LGBTQ programs for perpetrators and victims/survivors of domestic and family violence

Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety, 2020

Developed under the guidance of a project reference group comprised of key academics, clinicians and researchers in the areas of LGBTQ theory and practice, domestic and family violence interventions and social work practice, this research highlights the need to support the LGBTQ community in developing readiness to recognise domestic and family violence, and then seek support.

Identifying and responding to LGBTQ DFV/IPV can present specific challenges.

Key findings:
  • DFV/IPV in LGBTQ relationships can be difficult to identify and understand due to the “heterosexual face” of domestic violence.
  • DFV/IPV in LGBTQ relationships can involve unique tactics of abuse, including identity-based abuse.
  • Trauma from discrimination and stigma (minority stress) impact experiences of DFV/IPV for LGBTQ community members, but are not directly causal.
  • LGBTQ community readiness to recognise DFV/IPV and seek support, as well as service responses to LGBTQ people experiencing DFV/IPV, must be strengthened.

 

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Disability Support Toolkit for frontline workers – violence and abuse

1800RESPECT, March 2020

The Disability Support Toolkit has resources for front line workers supporting people with disability who have been impacted by violence and abuse.

People with disability are 1.8 times more likely to experience violence and abuse, including more varied forms of abuse. (Source: AIHW Report 2019.) They are also less likely, and take longer to reach out for support.

This Toolkit includes:

  • Research paper on best practice to implement the disability toolkit
  • Videos to share with clients on how to contact the 1800RESPECT service and how the service works
  • Easy English booklets that can be downloaded or ordered free from 1800RESPECT.

This Toolkit can be used in conjunction with information provided on our website on Inclusive Practice: Supporting people with disability.

‘Putting it into practice’ Guidelines

The ‘Putting it into Practice’ guidelines are a resource to support access and inclusion. The guidelines provide information on:

  • General principles
  • Engaging women with disabilities, including language
  • Using specialist resources

 

  • Download the guidelines in Word or PDF.

Scope Videos

This set of 3 videos were co-developed by Scope and 1800RESPECT. They are designed to be viewed by people with disability, and include information on how to contact 1800RESPECT, and how the service works.

  • Watch the videos here

Easy English booklets

The Easy English booklets have been developed as part of the Disability Pathways Project and with Women with Disabilities Australia. They are evidence based, user group tested and easy to use.

Sunny app

Sunny is 1800RESPECT’s app for women with disability who have experienced violence and abuse. Sunny has been co-designed with women with disability to make sure it provides the very best support for the people who use it. Learn more about Sunny. Sunny is free to download and is free to use on your phone.

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Towards a Safe Place: Raising Awareness of Domestic Violence in LGBTIQA+ Communities (resource)

Catalyst Foundation, 2019

The Towards a Safe Place project has created resources for LGBTIQA+ communities to use both as individuals or in communities to support and inform at risk individuals of available services and supports in relation to Domestic Violence and to increase awareness and understanding of Domestic Violence and its impact within LGBTIQA+ communities.

We have worked closely with LGBTIQA+ communities to develop these resources and are thankful for the help and support of our Reference Group comprising individuals, community organisations and service providers who have helped us in the development of these resources.

We hope the resources are used to inform and support at risk individuals and the wider community on LGBTIQA+ specific Domestic Violence and that service providers use the resources to continually develop and improve service responses and avenues for reporting domestic violence.

Training in culturally appropriate LGBTIQA+ domestic violence service delivery and response strategies is available and has been developed in partnership with Uniting Communities Adelaide’s Bfriend Project and a local LGBTIQA+ social group Pride of the South. If your organisation would like information on the training please contact us on (08) 81688700 or by email 

The project was supported by South Australian Government Attorney-General’s  Department, Bfriend (Uniting Communities) and Pride of the South.

Resources to download:

 

When Love Hurts: Domestic Violence Through the Lens of LGBTIQ+ Relationships

Diversity Council Australia (DCA), 21 Oct 2019

Power and control drive all domestic violence cases. But how does intimate partner violence play out in same sex and LGBTIQ+ relationships? What differences are there, and how do we recognise and put safety strategies in place to support them?

The Art of Inclusion* is DCA’s own podcast, peering into the lives of fascinating people, whose stories shed light on the wider social issues facing Australia, and the world.

In this episode, we hear first-hand from a survivor of domestic violence in a same-sex relationship.

The episode’s expert is Kai Noonan from ACON.

Produced and written by:Andrea Maltman Rivera and Sam Loy. Researched and hosted by: Andrew Maxwell. Executive produced by: Lisa Annese.

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