How YouTubers took over sex education

The Guardian, Tues March 13, 2018

With UK schools increasingly falling short, vloggers such as Hannah Witton and Laci Green have stepped up to offer guidance on everything from body confidence to sexual pleasure. 

YouTube sex educators are increasingly popular, and for the young people I speak to, such videos are where almost all their information about sex now comes from.

 

Sex Education Based on Abstinence? There’s a Real Absence of Evidence

New York Times, August 22, 2017

Religious conservatives worry that teaching teenagers about birth control will encourage premarital sex. Liberals argue that failing to teach about it ensures more unwanted pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases.

So it was a welcome development when, a few years ago, Congress began to shift funding for sex education to focus on evidence-based outcomes, letting effectiveness determine which programs would get money. But a recent move by the Trump administration seems set to undo this progress.

Sex education focused on an abstinence-only approach fails in a number of ways.

 

Teens should be educated about safer sexting not just abstinence, report says

The Guardian, Monday 31 October 2016

Teenagers should be educated on how to sext more safely and be respectful of each other rather than be persuaded by educational materials to abstain from sexting, a new report says.

The paper, written by Yfoundations youth health sector support officer Jessie Hunt, is a first in Australian public health policy. It says resources aimed at educating teenagers about sexting are outdated and perpetuate problematic notions surrounding gender.

Denied Birth Control, Teens Still Have Sex — Unsafe Sex

Refinery 29, June 16, 2016 3:40 PM

Kenyan-born and Tanzania-based sexual health educator Maureen Oduor knows that soda doesn’t prevent pregnancy, but not all of the young women she counsels do. “In Kenya, adolescents believe that drinking a glass of Coca-Cola soda before and after sex can prevent a girl from getting pregnant,” she tells me. In Tanzania, meanwhile, “people believe that use of contraceptives by a woman who has never had a child causes a woman to be barren or give birth to an abnormal child” — and in both countries, “there is a belief that if a girl [does] not have sex as a very early teen, like 12 or 13 years, then the vaginal opening is likely to close or get sealed.”

In her work in Tanzania for SHDEPHA, an organization that fights discrimination against people with HIV/AIDS and replaces contraception misinformation with education and services, Oduor is a professional myth-buster. Her passion for sex ed is personal.

Read more here

Scripture classes: Calls for crackdown on public schools re “dangerous” messages about sex

Sydney Morning Herald, May 6, 2015 – 9:19AM

Scripture books promoting “dangerous” messages about sex and male power are being used in NSW public schools, leading to calls for a crack down on special religious education.

Parent-run lobby group Fairness in Religions in Schools (FIRIS) has raised concerns.

Read more here

The Truth About Abstinence-Only Programs

Accurate, balanced sex education – including information about contraception and condoms – is a basic human right of youth. Such education helps young people to reduce their risk of potentially negative outcomes, such as unwanted pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Such education can also help youth to enhance the quality of their relationships and to develop decision-making skills that will prove invaluable over life. This basic human right is also a core public health principle.

Read more here