Clinical Practice Guidelines: Pregnancy Care (2018 Edition)

Australian Government Department of Health, February 2018

Modules 1 and 2 of the Antenatal Care Guidelines have now been combined and updated to form a single set of consolidated guidelines that were renamed Pregnancy Care Guidelines and publicly released in February 2018. 

The Pregnancy Care Guidelines are designed to support Australian maternity services to provide high-quality, evidence-based antenatal care to healthy pregnant women. They are intended for all health professionals who contribute to antenatal care including midwives, obstetricians, general practitioners, practice nurses, maternal and child health nurses, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers and allied health professionals. They are implemented at national, state, territory and local levels to provide consistency of antenatal care in Australia and ensure maternity services provide high-quality, evidence-based maternity care. The Pregnancy Care Guidelines cover a wide range of topics including routine physical examinations, screening tests and social and lifestyle advice for women with an uncomplicated pregnancy.

Guidelines:

Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care (PDF 5747 KB)
Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care (Word 3615 KB)

Accompanying documents:

Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Short-form guidelines (PDF 1979 KB)
Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Short-form guidelines (Word 1330 KB)

Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Administrative Report (PDF 1758 KB)
Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Administrative Report (Word 1150 KB)

Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Linking evidence to recommendations (PDF 2183 KB)
Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Linking evidence to recommendations (Word 1259 KB)
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Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Economic analyses (PDF 1804 KB)
Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Economic analyses (Word 1298 KB)

Breast cancer screening and cultural barriers: Why some women are missing early detection

ABC, Saturday 3 January, 2018

Some women say it’s fate. Others believe in “God’s will”. Then there are those who simply feel uncomfortable talking about their breasts. When it comes to breast cancer screening in culturally and linguistically diverse communities (CALD), there are varied and complex reasons that can hinder important messages about early detection.

A recent analysis of five studies involving more than 1,700 first-generation Chinese, African, Arabic, Korean and Indian-Australian women found just 19 per cent identified as “breast aware”, and only 27 per cent aged 40 or above had participated in annual clinical breast exams.

Lead researcher Dr Cannas Kwok, who’s been investigating the breast cancer beliefs and attitudes of migrant Australian women since 2005, says the results, published in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, are concerning.

Improving cultural understanding and engagement with people from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

1800RESPECT, July 2017

This article is adapted from Craig Rigney’s Workers Webinar presentation, Improving Cultural Understanding and Engagement with people from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Contents:

  • What is cultural understanding?
  • Am I using a cultural lens?
  • Engagement strategies
  • What is family or lateral violence?
  • Next steps

Further reading and related tools:

The barriers to medical abortion [in Australia]

Australian Journal of Pharmacy,  08/06/2017

Australian women are choosing medical abortion less often than international peers because there are barriers to access, argue two experts.

in countries where mifepristone has been available for some time, about half of women seeking to terminate a pregnancy choose it over surgical termination. Access in Australia is relatively recent, and at this stage only about a third of women seeking abortion choose the medical route.

 

Pregnancy outcome statistics (SA)

Pregnancy Outcome Unit, SA Health: November 2016

The Pregnancy Outcome Unit undertakes statewide monitoring of pregnancy characteristics and outcomes to identify population groups most at risk and determine preventive interventions. This is undertaken through data collections.

Each year, the Pregnancy Outcome Unit publishes two annual reports.

Pregnancy Outcome in South Australia provides annual analyses on pregnancies, obstetric care and the health of newborn babies. Additionally, this report also contains information on abortion rates, home births, numbers of babies born by caesarian section in private and public hospitals and the percentage of women who smoke during pregnancy.

  • The latest report was released in November 2106, and covers the period 2014. Download 2014 report (PDF) here 
  • Previous reports back to 2001 can be found here 

 

Australian report finds disturbing evidence of gender inequality

Guardian Australia, March 8th

Incorrect assumptions are being made that gender equality has been achieved despite disturbing and comprehensive evidence to the contrary, an investigation by Australia’s sex discrimination commissioner, Kate Jenkins, has found.

“There are many different voices in this, and my voice is tied to having spoken to rural women, LGBTI women, older women, women with disabilities, migrant women and Aboriginal women.”

  • Read more of article here 
  • Download the report (PDF) here
  • Download the infographic (jpg) here