Understanding the role of law and culture in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander communities in responding to and preventing family violence

ANROWS, 2020

Family violence within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities attracts considerable attention in policy, research and practice.

Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have advocated for community-led approaches to family violence that are culturally safe, involve Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander justice models and recognise Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Law and Culture.

This project used a strengths-based approach to explore the role that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Law and Culture plays in prevention, intervention and healing in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander family violence, and how this can be supported. The project was grounded in an understanding of family violence as shaped by the impacts of colonisation.

The research was undertaken in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander place-based programs in six sites: the Kimberley (two sites) and the Pilbara (Western Australia), the Tiwi Islands and Darwin (Northern Territory), and Mornington Island (Queensland).

The final report emphasises the need for improved understandings within mainstream systems and services of the nature of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander family obligations and interconnections, as well as acknowledgement of the link between violence and issues that stem from colonisation, such as alcohol misuse and intergenerational trauma. It recommends a greater focus on prevention, healing and diversions from the criminal legal system; the involvement of both men and women in the design and implementation of local family violence strategies; and interventions that worked at the family, rather than individual, level.

Marie Stopes Australia seeks signatories to open letter re changes to telehealth

July 2020
 
There are changes to Telehealth from Monday, July 20th which mean that clients who have not attended a service within the last 12 months – that is, new clients or clients who have not used a service in the last 12 months – will no longer be eligible for a Telehealth appointment.
 
Marie Stopes Australia has written an open letter about the impact of this change access to sexual and reproductive health services. If you are interested in endorsing the letter, you can add your name as a private individual or an organisation. 
 

Building on strengths to support Aboriginal young people’s sexual health

UNSW, originally published May 2020

The Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkage Project ‘What We Do Well’ has reached a milestone of halfway point and completion of the first major round of data collection, conducted by Aboriginal young people trained as part of the project to interview their peers.

‘What We Do Well’ is identifying the positive actions Aboriginal young people take to reduce their sexual risk and build sexual wellbeing. By describing the social, cultural and personal strengths and resources they draw on, the research will inform sexual health promotion practice to better support Aboriginal young people.

Baby born with “avoidable” congenital syphilis: experts

InDaily, June 04, 2020

The recent birth of a child in South Australia with congenital syphilis, despite the mother being previously diagnosed and treated for the sexually transmitted infection, has prompted SA Health concern about the quality of the treatment.

[A] public health alert [sent by SA Health] “reminds and advises health practitioners of their responsibilities” in managing syphilis cases and contacts.

General practitioner at not-for-profit sexual health service SHINE SA Amy Moten said the case was “significant” because it was an avoidable outcome.

New ‘Syphilis Is Still Out There’ Campaign for Health Professionals

The Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia (AHCSA) & SHINE SA, May 2020

The Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia (AHCSA) and SHINE SA have released a new social media campaign for health professionals.

The campaign aims to raise awareness of syphilis screening and treatment during COVID-19.

  • Syphilis Is Still Out There Campaign for Health Professionals

While we deal with the COVID-19 pandemic, the syphilis outbreak in South Australia continues. It’s essential that we continue to test, treat, cure and notify partners during this time.

To learn more visit www.shinesa.org.au/syphilisoutbreak

  • Social Media Tiles and Posters

To help support this campaign and reinforce key messages around syphilis prevention and treatment, we have a range of social media tiles and posters to download.

Help us share this campaign by downloading our social media tiles to share on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and LinkedIn. Use the hashtag #SyphilisIsStillOutThere

Download the files here as a zipped folder: Syphilis Is Still Out There Campaign

Key Messages of this Campaign 

  • Syphilis is still out there #SyphilisIsStillOutThere
  • Syphilis outbreak minimised in 4 steps: test, treat, cure and notify partners
  • Syphilis is still threatening unborn children. Know when to test before, during and after pregnancy

  • For the Community

Stay tuned: whilst this campaign is aimed at health professionals, AHCSA are currently producing resources to share on social media targeted towards community members.

To stay up-to-date follow AHCSA on Facebook.

 

Embracing Community this International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia, Intersexism and Transphobia (Media Release)

SHINE SA Media Release: 15 May 2020

International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia, Intersexism and Transphobia recognises the strength and community spirit of LGBTIQA+ people, allows for broader community support, while at the same time acknowledging the stigma, discrimination and violence faced by LGBTIQA+ individuals.

A sense of community can contribute to self-worth and acceptance as well as address isolation. A safe and welcoming community for LGBTIQA+ people provides essential support. This is especially true given that sexuality, gender identity and intersex status aren’t necessarily visible. Having a community provides a voice to ensure that LGBTIQA+ people’s needs and concerns are being heard.

In this time of social distancing for all of us, it’s more important than ever to maintain a sense of community. For many LGBTIQA+ people the current environment makes it difficult to physically connect with their communities, which is especially important if individuals are in isolation with unsupportive people.

For those that identify as LGBTIQA+, there are many groups and spaces available to stay connected with communities in South Australia. Some of the online spaces and services include:

  • qsOnline, a discord based social space for LGBTQIA+ people ran by The Queer Society. It has a range of different channels allowing people to talk about any and all of their interests.
  • Trans Femme SHINE SA and TransMascSA, private Facebook groups for transgender people to socialize and discuss their personal experience.
  • Moolagoo Mob & Blak Lemons, a social space for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who identify as LGBTIQA+, including sistergirls and brotherboys.
  • SHINE SA’s Gender Wellbeing Service and Gender Connect Country SA provide free peer-based support over the phone and can help provide connections through groups and other safe spaces for those that identify as trans, gender diverse or gender questioning.

Awareness and support for LGBTIQA+ people should also extend into our workplace. LGBTIQA+ training is key to providing an inclusive workplace, to learn more you can visit SHINE SA’s LGBTI Inclusion Training page.

SHINE SA celebrates International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia, Intersexism and Transphobia and recognises the particular strengths LGBTIQA+ people bring to all of our communities.

For further information and media enquiries contact Tracey Hutt, Director Workforce Education and Development