Changing Epidemiology of Gonorrhea in Adelaide, South Australia

Ellis SL, Tsourtos G, Waddell R, Woodman R, Miller ER.

Changing Epidemiology of Gonorrhea in Adelaide, South Australia.

Sex Transm Dis. 2020 Jun;47(6):402-408. doi: 10.1097/OLQ.0000000000001162.

Abstract

Background: Gonorrhea is a significant public health concern. The changing epidemiology of gonorrhea in Australia has highlighted the need for detailed examination of surveillance data to determine population groups at greatest risk for infection.

Methods: We analyzed deidentified gonorrhea notification data for the years 2012 to 2017, in Adelaide (N = 3680), calculating age-adjusted notification and antibiotic resistance rates. Age, gender, year, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status were assessed for associations with gonorrhea notifications using negative binomial, log binomial and spatial autoregressive models. Maps were generated to examine spatial localization of gonorrhea rates in Adelaide.

Results: Gonorrhea notification rates in Adelaide increased annually, with a 153% adjusted increase in rates from 2012 to 2017, localized to specific areas and inversely associated with income levels. The increase in rates in 2016 and 2017 was associated with young heterosexuals from low income areas. Azithromycin-resistant notifications increased significantly in 2016 in young heterosexuals. Reinfections were significantly more likely in men who have sex with men than other population groups.

Conclusions: This study demonstrates the changing epidemiology of gonorrhea in Adelaide from a largely men who have sex with men profile toward an increase in young heterosexual gonorrhea. This could be seen as a harbinger for future increases in heterosexually transmitted HIV and other sexually transmitted infections in Australia.

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Australian Burden of Disease Study: Illicit Drug Use, Intimate Partner Violence, Unsafe Sex

 Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Last updated: 

Burden of disease is a measure of the years of healthy life lost from living with, or dying from disease and injury. A portion of this burden is preventable, being due to modifiable risk factors. This report provides information on the deaths and burden of disease due to risk factors included in the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2015. 

New analyses of the key drivers of change over time in the burden of disease due to selected risk factors have recently been added to these data visualisations (August 2020).

The following excerpts may be of interest:

Or you can see all the data here

 

 

Diagnosis and Management of Syphilis in Patients With HIV Co-infection

Khaw, C., Malden, C., Ratnayake, M. et al. Diagnosis and Management of Syphilis in Patients With HIV Co-infectionCurr Treat Options Infect Dis (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40506-020-00225-6

Published

Purpose of review

Syphilis cases are on the increase especially in men who have sex with men (MSM) in urban areas of high-income countries.

There is a strong association between syphilis and HIV infections.

We review the more recent literature regarding the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic investigations, treatment and follow-up of syphilis in HIV infection.

  • Read abstract here (For full text access you can purchase from the publisher or see your librarian)

New fact sheet from SHINE SA: Trichomoniasis

SHINE SA, 17th June 2020

Trichomoniasis is a genital infection caused by the organism trichomonas vaginalis. It is spread through sexual contact.

You can learn more about trichomoniasis by reading our new Fact Sheet.

 

 

Baby born with “avoidable” congenital syphilis: experts

InDaily, June 04, 2020

The recent birth of a child in South Australia with congenital syphilis, despite the mother being previously diagnosed and treated for the sexually transmitted infection, has prompted SA Health concern about the quality of the treatment.

[A] public health alert [sent by SA Health] “reminds and advises health practitioners of their responsibilities” in managing syphilis cases and contacts.

General practitioner at not-for-profit sexual health service SHINE SA Amy Moten said the case was “significant” because it was an avoidable outcome.

SEXUAL HEALTH MATTERS: new clinical podcast from SHINE SA

SHINE SA, May 2020

Filled with quality clinical guidance and tips for best practice, SHINE SA’s new Sexual Health Matters – Clinical Podcast delves into the intimate regions of the body and broaches the uncomfortable conversations necessary to ensure client safety and sexual/reproductive well-being.

Through discussion, interview and explanation, experienced sexual health clinicians raise awareness of guidelines, resources, research and emerging trends to ensure that clinicians everywhere can provide excellent sexual and reproductive care to improve client outcomes.

If you have a topic you would like us to cover in future podcasts, email courses@shinesa.org.au to let us know!