Multiple factors explain why middle-aged heterosexuals with new sexual partners don’t use condoms

nam/aidsmap

New strategies and approaches are needed to address the sexual health needs of middle-aged heterosexuals starting new relationships, research published in Sexually Transmitted Infections suggests.

The UK study involved men and women aged between 40 and 59 years with, or considering, new sexual partners after the break-up of a long-term relationship. In-depth interviews showed that beliefs about sexual risk were frequently based on past rather than current circumstances and that individuals often felt that existing sexual health services were geared towards the needs of younger people.

New Videos for Clinicians – Syphilis: Symptoms, Serology, and Treatment

SHINE SA, 14/02/2020

SHINE SA have released two new short videos that provide advice for clinicians on syphilis symptoms and treatment. This resource expands on our syphilis overview for clinicians. 

The videos are presented by Sexual Health Physician Dr Carole Khaw, and cover the topics of signs, symptoms and stages as well as serology and treatment.

With an increase in syphilis cases in South Australia it is important that health professionals understand how to identify and treat syphilis.

If you would like to share this with your networks easily, you can use the email, Facebook, LinkedIn, or Twitter share buttons at the bottom of this post!

 

 

 

Free Online Recordings for Health Professionals: Andrology and Sexual Health

SHINE SA, January 2020

SHINE SA have made select online recordings available from our Andrology and Sexual Health Update Day event in 2019. These recordings will be beneficial to health professionals looking to brush up on their knowledge of andrology and sexual health.

The online recordings available cover topics including sexual dysfunction, pelvic pain, PrEP and PEP, chemsex, androgen deficiency, gender affirming care and the SA syphilis outbreak.

All recording are available free of charge.

Updated Guidelines: Australian STI & HIV Testing Guidelines 2019 for Asymptomatic MSM

Sexually Transmissible Infections in Gay Men Action Group (STIGMA), September 2019

Most sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are asymptomatic. Testing and treatment of asymptomatic men who have sex with men (MSM) is the most effective method to interrupt transmission and reduce the burden of illness. In particular, syphilis is increasingly common, is often asymptomatic, and can cause significant morbidity.

The main barriers to STI control are insufficient frequency of testing in MSM, and incomplete testing. For example, chlamydia and gonorrhoea tests should be performed at all three sites (swab of oropharynx and anorectum, and first
pass urine), and syphilis serology should be performed every time a HIV test or HIV treatment monitoring is performed.

HIV is now a medically preventable infection. All men who are eligible under the Australian HIV Pre-Exposure guidelines should be actively offered PrEP: www.ashm.org.au/HIV/PrEP All people with HIV should be advised to commence treatment and, where possible, have an undetectable viral load.
These guidelines are intended for all MSM, including trans men who have sex with other men .

This current version is endorsed by the Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, and Sexual Health Medicine, Australasian Sexual Health Alliance, Australasian Chapter of Sexual Health Medicine of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians and is approved as an accepted clinical resource by the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners.

HIV & Sexual Health Update for Nurses and Aboriginal Health Workers in South Australia

Adelaide Sexual Health Centre , October 2019

Adelaide Sexual Health Centre presents Stepping Out: Living Healthy & Long, an HIV & Sexual Health Update for Nurses and Aboriginal Health Workers in South Australia.

With the generous support of an unconditional education grant from ViiV Healthcare, ASHC is able to provide a seminar at no cost to the participant, hosted in central Adelaide with reduced rate car parking next door.

Participants will enjoy an update on sexual health, HIV and Hepatitis with speakers from Adelaide Sexual Health Centre as well as key health partners.

The attached flyer (below) details the event and the sponsor, and the final programme will be posted shortly.

Participants must register to attend. This allows the organisers to manage catering etc.

When: Saturday 6th Nov, 930 am – 2 pm

Where: Pullman Hotel, 16 Hindmarsh Square Adelaide

Cost: Free

Kissing may be an important and neglected risk factor for oropharyngeal gonorrhoea

Kissing may be an important and neglected risk factor for oropharyngeal gonorrhoea: a cross-sectional study in men who have sex with men

Chow EPFCornelisse VJWilliamson DA, et al

Abstract:

Objectives A mathematical model suggested that a significant proportion of oropharyngeal gonorrhoea cases are acquired via oropharynx-to-oropharynx transmission (ie, tongue-kissing), but to date, no empirical study has investigated this. This study aimed to examine the association between kissing and oropharyngeal gonorrhoea among gay and bisexual men who have sex with men (MSM).

Methods MSM attending a public sexual health centre in Melbourne, Australia, between March 2016 and February 2017 were invited to participate in a brief survey that collected data on their number of male partners in the last 3 months, in three distinct categories: kissing-only (ie, no sex including no oral and/or anal sex), sex-only (ie, any sex without kissing), and kissing-with-sex (ie, kissing with any sex). Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to examine associations between oropharyngeal gonorrhoea positivity by nucleic acid amplification tests and the three distinct partner categories.

Results A total of 3677 men completed the survey and were tested for oropharyngeal gonorrhoea. Their median age was 30 (IQR 25–37) and 6.2% (n=229) had oropharyngeal gonorrhoea. Men had a mean number of 4.3 kissing-only, 1.4 sex-only, and 5.0 kissing-with-sex partners in the last 3 months. Kissing-only and kissing-with-sex were associated with oropharyngeal gonorrhoea, but sex-only was not. The adjusted odds for having oropharyngeal gonorrhoea were 1.46-fold (95% CI 1.04 to 2.06) for men with ≥4 kissing-only partners and 1.81-fold (95% CI 1.17 to 2.79) for men with ≥4 kissing-with-sex partners.

Conclusions These data suggest that kissing may be associated with transmission of oropharyngeal gonorrhoea in MSM, irrespective of whether sex also occurs.