When Love Hurts: Domestic Violence Through the Lens of LGBTIQ+ Relationships

Diversity Council Australia (DCA), 21 Oct 2019

Power and control drive all domestic violence cases. But how does intimate partner violence play out in same sex and LGBTIQ+ relationships? What differences are there, and how do we recognise and put safety strategies in place to support them?

The Art of Inclusion* is DCA’s own podcast, peering into the lives of fascinating people, whose stories shed light on the wider social issues facing Australia, and the world.

In this episode, we hear first-hand from a survivor of domestic violence in a same-sex relationship.

The episode’s expert is Kai Noonan from ACON.

Produced and written by:Andrea Maltman Rivera and Sam Loy. Researched and hosted by: Andrew Maxwell. Executive produced by: Lisa Annese.

d

‘My mob is telling their story and it makes me feel good’: here’s what Aboriginal survivors of child sexual abuse told us they need

The Conversation, October 22, 2019 6.00am AEDT

There are an estimated 60,000 survivors of institutional child sexual abuse in Australia. Based on the private sessions held as part of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, 15% of survivors are Aboriginal. That suggests an estimated 9,000 Aboriginal survivors. This is likely an under estimation.

Not only do Aboriginal survivors experience the trauma of institutional child sexual abuse, if they were part of the Stolen Generations, they also experience the cultural trauma from being forcibly removed from family as children because they were Aboriginal. These children were denied connection to community, country, spirituality, language and culture.

This context and its impacts today, including ongoing disadvantage and systemic racism, needs to be understood in developing healing solutions for Aboriginal survivors.

Domestic & Family Violence: Strangulation Awareness Training

Women’s Safety Services SA, October 2019

Domestic and Family Violence: Strangulation Awareness is a specialised course in understanding and responding to this key high risk factor. The latest research will be presented as well as a practice framework for responding to disclosures.

  • Tuesday 31st October 2019
  • 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm
  • Location advised on registration (Mile End area)
  • Cost: $90**

**limited half price tickets available for full time students – contact kellyb@womenssafetyservices.com.au for details of how to access these tickets

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

  • Understand the signs and symptoms of strangulation
  • Understand the physiological consequences of strangulation
  • Identify factors that indicate risk of serious harm or death in D&FV
  • Respond to disclosures of strangulation from risk and safety response model

For further information about this course, please contact the Learning and Education Coordinator: kellyb@womenssafetyservices.com.au

Women with disabilities: publications

Women with Disabilities ACT, updated 2019

On this page you can find all of Women with Disabilities ACT’s major submissions to government, research reports and policy statements. Accessible versions have been provided where possible.

Some relevant documents on the page include:

  • Contraception, Consent, Respectful Relationships & Sexuality, May 2019 [pdf] [docx]
  • WWDACT Submission to the Inquiry into Maternity Services in the ACT, January 2019 [pdf] [docx]
  • Contraception and Consent: A Comparative Analysis of the Legal Frameworks for Accessing Contraception, August 2017 [pdf] [docx]
  • WWDACT Submission on the Inquiry into the Crimes (Consent) Amendment Bill 2018, September 2018 [pdf]
  • WWDACT Letter Supporting the Crimes (Consent) Amendment Bill 2018, March 2018 [pdf]
  • WWDACT Submission to the Justice and Community Safety Directorate: Sexual Assault Guidelines – Restorative Justice Referrals February 2018 [pdf]
  • WWDACT Submission to Discussion Paper: Domestic and Family Violence – Policy Approaches and Responses, September 2017 [pdf]
  • WWDACT Submission to the ALRC—Family Violence Cth Laws 2011, October 2011 [pdf] [Rich Text]

Access webpage here 

Social housing landlords use domestic violence as reason to evict victims – study

Guardian Australia, Thu 13 Jun 2019 

Social housing landlords are evicting low-income domestic violence survivors because the abuse they suffer can be considered a “nuisance” breach under existing tenancy laws, a new study has found.

Researchers from two universities analysed lease terminations data, nearly 100 state tribunal and court decisions, as well as case studies from housing providers to assess the impact on the nation’s most vulnerable tenants.

 

Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer Men’s Attitudes and Experiences of Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Assault

Sorting it out: Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer Men’s Attitudes and Experiences of Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Assault

Sexualities and Genders Research (SaGR), Western Sydney University & ACON, May 2019

This research on Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer (GBTIQ) men’s attitudes and experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual assault (SA) was undertaken in 2017-2018.

Sexualities and Genders Research (SaGR), at Western Sydney University was commissioned to undertake the survey by ACON (formerly known as AIDS Council of New South Wales), who collaborated in the survey design and analysis. An online survey was completed by 895 GBTIQ-identifying men, primarily focusing on IPV in same-sex relationships.

However, the survey included questions about SA, with some men providing additional
information on SA in the open-ended questions in the survey.

The survey did not ask specific questions about criminal victimisation or perpetration in relationships but was instead focused on men’s views and experiences of healthy and unhealthy relationships.

Overview of findings:
• GBTIQ men want healthy and safe relationships for themselves, their friends and community.
• GBTIQ men are certain about the illegality and unacceptability of sexual assault and
domestic violence