Understanding the role of law and culture in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander communities in responding to and preventing family violence

ANROWS, 2020

Family violence within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities attracts considerable attention in policy, research and practice.

Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have advocated for community-led approaches to family violence that are culturally safe, involve Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander justice models and recognise Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Law and Culture.

This project used a strengths-based approach to explore the role that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Law and Culture plays in prevention, intervention and healing in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander family violence, and how this can be supported. The project was grounded in an understanding of family violence as shaped by the impacts of colonisation.

The research was undertaken in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander place-based programs in six sites: the Kimberley (two sites) and the Pilbara (Western Australia), the Tiwi Islands and Darwin (Northern Territory), and Mornington Island (Queensland).

The final report emphasises the need for improved understandings within mainstream systems and services of the nature of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander family obligations and interconnections, as well as acknowledgement of the link between violence and issues that stem from colonisation, such as alcohol misuse and intergenerational trauma. It recommends a greater focus on prevention, healing and diversions from the criminal legal system; the involvement of both men and women in the design and implementation of local family violence strategies; and interventions that worked at the family, rather than individual, level.

Building on strengths to support Aboriginal young people’s sexual health

UNSW, originally published May 2020

The Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkage Project ‘What We Do Well’ has reached a milestone of halfway point and completion of the first major round of data collection, conducted by Aboriginal young people trained as part of the project to interview their peers.

‘What We Do Well’ is identifying the positive actions Aboriginal young people take to reduce their sexual risk and build sexual wellbeing. By describing the social, cultural and personal strengths and resources they draw on, the research will inform sexual health promotion practice to better support Aboriginal young people.

Baby born with “avoidable” congenital syphilis: experts

InDaily, June 04, 2020

The recent birth of a child in South Australia with congenital syphilis, despite the mother being previously diagnosed and treated for the sexually transmitted infection, has prompted SA Health concern about the quality of the treatment.

[A] public health alert [sent by SA Health] “reminds and advises health practitioners of their responsibilities” in managing syphilis cases and contacts.

General practitioner at not-for-profit sexual health service SHINE SA Amy Moten said the case was “significant” because it was an avoidable outcome.

New ‘Syphilis Is Still Out There’ Campaign for Health Professionals

The Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia (AHCSA) & SHINE SA, May 2020

The Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia (AHCSA) and SHINE SA have released a new social media campaign for health professionals.

The campaign aims to raise awareness of syphilis screening and treatment during COVID-19.

  • Syphilis Is Still Out There Campaign for Health Professionals

While we deal with the COVID-19 pandemic, the syphilis outbreak in South Australia continues. It’s essential that we continue to test, treat, cure and notify partners during this time.

To learn more visit www.shinesa.org.au/syphilisoutbreak

  • Social Media Tiles and Posters

To help support this campaign and reinforce key messages around syphilis prevention and treatment, we have a range of social media tiles and posters to download.

Help us share this campaign by downloading our social media tiles to share on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and LinkedIn. Use the hashtag #SyphilisIsStillOutThere

Download the files here as a zipped folder: Syphilis Is Still Out There Campaign

Key Messages of this Campaign 

  • Syphilis is still out there #SyphilisIsStillOutThere
  • Syphilis outbreak minimised in 4 steps: test, treat, cure and notify partners
  • Syphilis is still threatening unborn children. Know when to test before, during and after pregnancy

  • For the Community

Stay tuned: whilst this campaign is aimed at health professionals, AHCSA are currently producing resources to share on social media targeted towards community members.

To stay up-to-date follow AHCSA on Facebook.

 

Webinar: Syphilis Outbreak in the Indigenous Community

SHINE SA, posted May 14, 2020

This free education session is presented by Adelaide Sexual Health Centre and will provide an update on syphilis.

General practitioners, nurses and/or midwives, Aboriginal Health Practitioners and Aboriginal Health Workers are encouraged to register for this training.

COURSE DETAILS

Date: 16 June 2020
Time: 7:00pm – 9:00pm

The webinar will cover:

  • Update on epidemiology
  • Review of diagnosis, staging and management of syphilis cases
  • How to interpret syphilis serology
  • Syphilis in pregnancy
  • Approaches to Partner Notification
  • Introduction to the South Australian Syphilis Register

Presenters:
Dr Alison Ward, Senior Consultant Sexual Health Physician
Njirrah Rowe, Aboriginal STI Education Coordinator and Partner Notification Officer

This activity is pending RACGP approval for 4 CPD activity points

This session is part of the Syphilis Outbreak Response and is a partnership between SHINE SA and Adelaide Sexual Health Centre.

No cost to attend.

Closing the Gap report 2020 shows only two targets on track

ABC, 12/02/2020

The 12th Closing the Gap report, tabled in Parliament today, shows Aboriginal children still trail far behind non-Indigenous children in literacy, numeracy and writing skills.

The report also shows the country is on track to meet just two of seven government targets to reduce the disparity in health, education and employment outcomes.

Gains in Indigenous health have been the same or smaller than those for non-Indigenous Australians — meaning gaps are persisting and, in the case of child mortality, widening. There has been no progress on a goal to close the life expectancy gap by 2031.

  • Read more of news article here
  • Read the report online here
  • Download full report PDF here